Frog pair in mating amplexus

At last we have seen frogs in Leicestershire.

We were working by the pond and were accompanied by such a noise – at first we thought it was a duckling separated from its mother but it turned out to be a very noisy pair of frogs. One clump of spawn already in the pond and this female makes only 2 breeding female frogs for our pond so far this year. A huge decrease on years gone by.

When you think that only 5 of every 1000 frog eggs survives to adulthood and the rest provide food for other wildlife – there is a definite loss to the food chain in our pond and a loss of potential adults to come back to us in future years.

That food chain could be the cause of our frog problems – we have a good size colony of Smooth newts that could be feeding on our young frog tadpoles.

 

Other problems that could be affecting a frog population could be:

  • a lack of plants to hide and protect the young frogs
  • a lack of deep water in one section of the pond that will remain unfrozen in Winter as some males stay in the pond
  • surrounding the pond with paving slabs as emerging froglets can stick to these in hot weather or be easily spotted by birds
  • a lack of cool damp places – ideal would be a bog garden – even if you didn’t have a pond a damp bog garden would give shade and shelter to frogs in the height of Summer that may have mated nearby
  • a shortage of wildlife corridors – gaps beneath the fence between yourself and your neighbours that allow all amphibians to make their journeys from Winter quarters to breeding waters and then to Summer shelter. Create linked habitats in the urban hard landscaping.

For more information on frog survival in your pond see our Tips and Advice page.