pond edge plants

Our latest published article with RHS looks at pond edge plants that grow where water meets land. The plants that thrive in this area need consistently wet soil – either underwater or in wet mud. The article is published in The RHS magazine The Garden this September 2016 and is entitled ‘Making wet feet an asset’.

You can read the full article here or see it in our Library.

We talk about the pond edge plants that we classify as shelf  <p>Suitable for shelf depth 0-13cm (0-5”) below water surface</p> on the website that grow in water on a pond shelf up to 13cm (5″) deep or that can thrive with their crowns on the surface of a muddy, permanently wet bog garden. These plants can all be found in the Pond plant pages of the website.

We also outline how to create a ‘bog garden’ as an additional area to an existing garden pond. This will create an emergence zone of wet muddy soil for the wildlife around part of the water area that provides protection and shade as the creatures come and go from the waters’ edge.

Plants for shallow pond edges and wet bog areas offer diverse heights, growth habits and flowering periods that can create an interesting and wildlife friendly emergence zone both in and around the edges of a ponds water area.

You could choose to plant an emergence zone as a moist loving plant zone instead.  The area would then need to be constructed with more drainage holes so as not to remain permanently wet. Moist loving plants <p>Suitable for moist soil (damp but drained)</p> (in the moist pages of the website) are found in a damp but drained area of the garden that many people might call a ‘bog garden’ but that is not actually boggy.

The two areas should not be confused. Moist loving plants will not survive if their roots are in permanently wet soil. Read our ebook ‘How to plant garden areas that hold moisture‘ for more clarity on planting the two different areas.

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